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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the region's fij troubles. but the auto market in russia is in high gear. new vehicle sales last year topped 2.9 million units, closing the gap with the largest european market, germany. people from vladivostok, who work in the industry, have long lived in the shadow of those from moscow. but now they're taking a turn in the spotlight. nhk world's anastasia strebkova reports. >> reporter: in vladivostok about 90% of the vehicles on the road are foreign brand name cars including japanese. several vehicles used to dominate the market, fwhu cars have been outnumbering used autos in recent years. a japanese affiliate handles car sales of toyota motor in vladivostok. it is projected a jump in sales, so the dealership renovated its showroom. it achieved its sales target last year, 2,000 units for the first time. >> translator: everything about japanese cars is good. they are comfortable and economical. if you want to buy a car, i recommend a japanese one. >> reporter: sports utility vehicles are big sellers. they're useful on the icy roads that are common in russia's far east. vehicles are aut $10
russia today with the power of an atomic bomb, shattering windows and injuring more than 1,000 people. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonightwe get the latest on the spectacle, and today's other cosmic event-- a close encounter with a large asteroid. >> this thing is pretty big. it's about half the size of a football field, although there are larger ones out there that we're tracking. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner updates the president's push to curb gun violence as he takes his case to his hometown of chicago. >> brown: mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks with homeland security secrery janet nolitano about combating the gring threat of cyber attacks. >> to the extent that some are seeking to infiltrate our network, steal that information, not have to invest in the research and development that goes into innovation, that's a really big deal. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> ppo
from another province. he says the cans are selling well. >>> senior officials from japan and russia are trying to resolve the things that divide them. they found common ground in an area of mutual concern. they met in moscow for the japan-russia strategic dialogue. the scope of the discussion went well beyond their two countries. japan's vice foreign minister met with the deputy foreign minister. the diplomats agreed to work together to encourage the north koreans to exercise self-restraint. japanese prime minister shinzo abe plans to visit russia some time this year. saying russian officials, too, want to nurture the relationship. haveundamental diffences d they over russian-held islands which are claimed by japan. but they've agreed to work toward resolving territorial and other disputes. their own to clarify the official on the northern claims. they want to be understood in and outside the country. japan is caught up over the senkaku islands. right now teams fm the foreign min tri, the cabinet office and the cabinet handle those files. they will expand the cabinet team to coordin
with the president. he sent president mori to russia last week to begin longstanding talks with russia. abe will meet later this year with vladimir putin to discuss the territories which are controlled by russia and claimed by japan. abe and obama agreed to cooperate on another source of concern. they said they'll work through the u.n. secretary council on tougher sanctions in north korea. they have urged leaders in pyongyang to stop the provocation, however, those leaders have already signalled their intentions to defy those warnings. president obama indulged the japan-u.s. alliance the central foundation for allegiance security. abe agreed it worked to their mutual benefit. >>> china's leaders were paying close attention to abe's visit, and they didn't like what they heard. a government spokesperson took issue with another statement on ownership of the senkaku islands. >> translator: no matter what excuses are made, japan can't change the fact that it illegally occupies chinese territory. >> they will urge china's leaders to address the issue correctly. she said they should be able to work to impro
by russia and the united states and other neighbors in bringing these parties together to talk, provide a kind of structure for that. is that taking place in any way. >> they haven't been willing to say that assad stepping down is inevitable and needs to occur at the beginning. and you know it has to be that way in order for this to have a political solution. >> so how can the opposition meet with assad with all the blood on his hands. >> yeah. >> how possibly can they do that. >> so that is a nonstarter that the opposition will meet with assad but they might meet with representatives. >> i think what al chatib said who itheead of the rian opposition council that they would be willing to meet with representatives of the government going forward here. now your point, the right way forward here would be to have an international umbrella group that would sponsor a political transition. we put this together at geneva last june, secretary clinton did, which mandated or agreed that there would be a political transition, that there would be opposition and government members of that transition
in central russia say they've found fragments of a meteorite that exploded in the sky. the shockwaves damaged more than 4,000 buildings. officials found a hole in a frozen lake and discovered fragments of rock nearby. an expert from the russian academy of science told a news agency the fragments came from the meteorite. >>> workers are replacing shattered windows. local glass producers can't keep up with demand. government officials are helping find supplies in neighboring regions. temperatures can drop below minus 15 degrees celsius. teachers at some schools have canceled their classes till the windows are fixed. >>> two russian pilots had a close shave when the meteorite exploded near their plane. they spoke on sunday to a russian broadcaster. >> translator: i saw a glittering fireball. as we were coming in for landing. i thought later how lucky we were that the meteorite didn't hit our plane. >> the meteor crossed in front of his plane, then came a huge blast. the captain said the plane already had its landing gear down, making it more vulnerable it the co-pilot describes seeing the meteor
. russia control tgs islands and japan claims them. >> translator: this is an important year to build a new relationship. i hope it paves the way for abe's visit. >> mori delivered a letter from abe. putin said he, too, hoped for better things ahead. >> translator: i'm looking forward to meeting with prime minister abe. i hope it will lead to improved relations. >> mori and putin discussed a statement issued in 2001 when mori was prime minister. the statement reaffirmed the validity of the 1956 japan soviet joint declaration. the declaration states that russia will return two of the disputed islands to japan after a peace treaty is signed. officials never signed the treaty. still, mori and putin agreed they can't ignore the statement. putin says it's abnormal that the countries have no peace treaty. mori says japanese and russian leaders need to resolve the territorial issue. >>> people in western japan are preparing for a ceremony to promote the country's claim to islands in the sea of japan, territory they call takashima. the japanese government will send a representative for the first ti
in a proxy war supported by iran and russia. the other side of the debate is nothing else is working and we need to create pressure on assad and build relationship with people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels, al-qaeda affiliated rebels the united states and the west doesn't support. and i don't think it's in the west's interest to see them end up at the top of the heap. >> rose: and then we turn to the story of the chinese army spying on the american government and american companies with david sanger of the "new york times," dune lawrence and michael riley of bloomberg businessweek. >> the cyber has been off to the side as something of an annoyance. i'm hearing this has gotten so big it's moving to the center of the relationship and it risks the rest of the relationship. i think the next thing you're going to see the president sending some kind of envoy to beijing to make that point. >> rose: the conflict in syria and spying on the united states by the chinese army when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios
. >> translator: i want russia to be truly free and democratic. i hope watching our broadcast will encourage people to work for a better society. >> reporter: with little income from advertisers, they are still not turning a profit, but are determined to keep going. she says freedom of speech is at stake. nhk world, moscow. >>> now students from the south pacific have traveled to northeastern japan to learn how to better prepare for natural disasters. they met with survivors of the earthquake and tsunami in march 2011. 18 students from the island of nauru visited students on the island of miyagi. this tsunami survivor took them to see a 2,400-meter long breakwater. she told them how the concrete structure was supposed to protect coastal neighborhoods, but the waves surged over it and swamped homes and businesses. >> translator: elderly people ran for their lives at that moment. >> she said seniors were thankful the tsunami escape route had handrails. she urged the group to always be ready for natural disasters in order to save lives. one of the students said nauru could be hit by a tsunami,
growing, and russia is still growing. india, which is the fourth of the brick countries, should have a better track in 2014. >> susie: depending which country you're talking about, we've seen investors pouring a lot of money into international equity funds since january. so c they expect to get a good return on international investing in 2013? >> susie, it is going to come down to everybody's timeframe. we are a culture that wants it now. we've been through a lot of problems recently that make people very risk adverse. if you have the patience to sit through volatility, buying emerging markets is a good investment now. however, if you still feel burned by what happened in 2007 and 2008, and are worried that a 10% pullback or a 15% pullback would ke you chang your approach, be very careful and buying emerging markets. we've had a great run since november and i would counsel some caution. >> susie: you are advising your clients to put their money mostly in u.s. stocks over international stocks. give us your thinking there. >> my thinking there is pretty straightforward. what happens is
grade. representatives of six countries including the u.s. and russia are expected to resume talks with iranian officials later this month. those negotiations have been stalled for eight months. >>> pope benedict xvi has made his first appearance since announcing he will resign. thousands of faithful welcomed the 85-year-old has he entered saint peter basilica. he will be the first to resign in nearly 600 years. he'll give his final audience on february 27th, one die before he steps down. they're preparing to hold a conclave in mid-march. >>> a section of roof at the chernobyl nuclear complex has collapsed, prompting workers to evacuate. ukrainian authorities say no one was injured. and they say there were no leaks of radiation. officials say a 600 square-meter section partially covered the turbine ha. workers built it after the nuclear disaster in 1986. it gave way under the weight of heavy snow. contractors are building a new protective structure to cover the number 4 reactor, about 150 meters away. foremen for a french construction company pulled out 80 workers as a precaution.
.s., britain, france, russia and china plus germany-- was catherine ashton of the european union. >> i hope that the iranian side are looking positivelyn t proposals that we've put forward. we work extremely hard in a very considered manner collectively on behalf of the united nations security council who mandate us to do so in order to try and get >> warner: far from almaty, secretary of state kerry said in paris that the talks had been useful, but he also reiterated the u.s. position. >> iran knows what it needs to do. the president has made clear his determination to implement his policy that iran will not have a clear weapon. >> warner: and in jerusalem, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu called again for the threat of military measures. >> i believe that this requires the international community to ratchet up its sanctions and make clear that if this continues there will be also a credible military sanction. i think no other means will make iran obey the wishes of the international community. >> warner: iran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful energy production, not weap
. brazil, russia, who? >> rose: none of the emerging nations. >> i don't think so. and it's possible that a brand-new pattern will emerge from this resorting of wealth and power. but the world needs leadership now. on the issue imate, water, topsoil, population, distribution of wealth in the global economy, you can go down the list. and the only obvious candidate to provide leadership in the word is united states. now many perceive the united states as having gone through a relative decline in power. there's evidence to that effect. but it's not clear that that is a persistent pattern. it is clear that the only wayhe united states n play what i think its natural role is, to provide leadership to the world o i do think that people around the world still look to the united states in spite of their disappointments, in spite of their concerns, as a kind of avatar among nations and if we are to play that role, those of us who are citizens of the united states have to reclaim the integrity of our democracy. it is failing us. the middle csss being hollowed out. somehow a majority or at lea
to andrew's point, i don't think we're doing much. i think on the diplomatic front we have hid behind russia and on the military front we have been fairly relevant to the flow of this conflict on the ground. and we sort of have had this idea of a splendid distance from syria but are not able to maintain that indefinitely. >> suarez: but does that narrow your choices when you decide what you is to do, andrew, to fithat irlevae as vali caed it. >> the problem is when you get involved in a game late, you're cornered. and you also have to intervene in ways you might not have wanted to do from the beginning. so in the case of ot bama administration very reticent to get involved with armed groups, but now we are looking at something very real. real threat of the use of chemical weapons. the possibility of a failed state in a divided state in syria. and also a haven for terrorists and the propensity for all of that to spill over its borders into the vital allies like israel, like turkey, iraq, jordan and so nd also into lebanon grows every day with no end in sight. >> suarez: but you both painted t
is necessary to prevent that from getting a nuclear weapon. ( applause ) at the same time, we'll engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenal and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into the wrong hands. because our ability to influence others depends on our willingness to lead. and meet our obligations. america must also face the rapidly growing threat from cyber attacks. now, we know hackers steal people's identities and infiltrate private emails. we know foreign countries and companies swipe our corporate secrets. now our enemies are also seeking the ability to sabotage our power grid, our financial institutions, our air traffic control systems. we cannot look back years from now and wonder why we did nothing in the face of real threats to our security and our economy. that's why earlier today, i signed a new executive order that will strengthen our cyber defenses by increasing information sharing and developing standards to protect our national security, our jobs, and our privacy. (pplause ) but now congress must act as well. by
'll engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenal and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into the wrong hands. because our ability to influence others depends on our willingness to lead. and meet our obligations. america must also face the rapidly growing threat from cyber attacks. now, we know hackers steal people's identities and infiltrate private emails. we know foreign countries and companies swipe our corporate secrets. now our enemies are also seeking the ability to sabotage our power grid, our financial institutions, our air traffic control systems. we cannot look back years from now and wonder why we did nothing in the face of real threats to our security and our economy. that's why earlier today, i signed a new executive order that will strengthen our cyber defenses by increasing information sharing and developing standards to protect our national security, our jobs, and our privacy. ( applause ) but now congress must act as well. by passing legislation to give our government a greater capacity to secure our networks a
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)